Careers after LLB

For a law graduate, a large number of career opportunities open up. Listed below are some of those:

  • Advocacy

One of the main professions chosen by an LLB graduate. In order to practice as an advocate and practise in the courts, students have to first qualify the exam conducted by the Bar Council of India.

  • Legal Advisor

After graduating, a student can join a law firm; and practise as a legal advisor. Legal advisors mainly and primarily prove clients with legal advice. They are mainly hired by large corporations and government organizations for legal help.

  • Document-Drafting Lawyer

An LLB graduate can also work as a document drafting lawyer. They mainly specialize in drafting various documents (agreements, case material, etc.)

  • Judge

A career in the judiciary system of India is another attractive prospect for an LLB graduate. This position requires them to clear the judicial exam conducted by the Public Service Commission.

  • Legal Process Outsourcing

It refers to the practice of a law firm that acquires legal services from an exterior firm.

Types of LPO providers

  • Third-party multiservice providers
  • Third-party niche providers
  • Captive centers of large legal & audit firms
  • Captive centers of corporate legal departments 
  • Journalist/Legal Journalist

Working as a journalist is not only socially relevant (which means you can have tremendous job satisfaction), but also emotionally rewarding.

Journalism Careers after LLB

  • A legal education already equips you with comprehensive writing and research skills, besides guiding you to be thorough with facts and figures. You can be reporting on legal issues for which you need no additional training, or on a host of other issues for which on-the-job learning is the best bet. An attractive aspect of a career in journalism is that a liberal arts background is more than sufficient for this profession.
  • The skills one picks up at law school are more than sufficient to begin a career in journalism. Then, of course, there is on-the-job learning. Indeed, employers do regularly conduct workshops for the rookies.
  • As long as you are interested in an occupation that is socially relevant, and willing to pursue a career that is not strictly connected with law, this is certainly a very exciting avenue to explore.
  • As far as job satisfaction goes, if one speaks to lawyers who have taken up journalism, they say it makes you feel alive. The very fact one is doing a service to society leads to tremendous satisfaction. Thus, it is clear that a career in journalism offers both challenges and rewards, and is an intellectually stimulating experience.
  • A word of caution - It would hardly be reasonable to expect the same level of financial compensation in the field of journalism as a corporate law job or even a successful litigating practice might offer. Having said that, the pay scales ultimately depend upon the employing organizations.

Journalism Career: Points to Keep in Mind

  • Expressing ideas and opinions, or reporting of facts that is required of a journalist is rather different from the kind of legal writing law students are familiar with.
  • A journalist must be able to convey the message in a simple, yet effective & convincing manner. Towards this end, it is imperative to avoid unnecessarily complicated legal jargon and archaic language after stepping into the field of journalism. This might sound a bit difficult, but it is just a matter of getting out of a habit.
  • Unlike law, journalism is not a zero-sum game. As a lawyer one is trained to present one side of the picture with great conviction and powerful arguments. However, for a journalist, objectivity of opinion and viewpoint is of utmost importance. A journalist has to tell a story, not win a case!
  • There are no prerequisites for being a journalist; and this is especially true if you are a law student. It would help, however, if you have a publication or two (non-legal ones, of course). That will ensure a smoother transition from law school to the world of journalism.

Speak to Counsellor